Gun Free Zone Woes

I know several people in the gun culture who plan their entire lives around where they can or cannot carry their defensive firearms. For instance, if they find out that a favorite restaurant legally posts the state-mandated signs to prevent concealed carry, they ignore how much they love those delicious tacos and go somewhere else. While I can understand the political motivation that often undergirds this attitude, it simply doesn’t make sense from a personal defense perspective. I can understand “voting with your money” so to speak as a way of advocating for your rights, but if you tell me that you don’t go to a place or do things that require you to be unarmed because it makes you less safe; your logic is off. When we start to adjust our entire lifestyles around where we can and can’t carry our firearms, we are not only succumbing to an improper mindset about personal defense, we are cheating ourselves out of a lot of positive experiences. To be clear, I am not saying that you shouldn’t carry your firearm wherever you are legally allowed to, just that you shouldn’t let those situations and places where it is either illegal or inappropriate to do so keep you from partaking in whatever activity you were planning to partake in.

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Firearms are the most efficient tools for responding to an attack with deadly force in the statistically unlikely but still plausible situations that may call for such a response. However, they are not magical talismans that make you safer simply because you possess them on your person at any given time. There are many personal defense situations that are not solved by the use of a defensive firearm, and there are many that a firearm might solve more efficiently, but that can still be solved without one. Just because you find yourself unarmed in a situation where deadly force might be an option doesn’t mean that you are incapable of defending yourself. To have a mentality that fixates on your gun as some sort of security blanket is unwise, especially when it leads you to be a curmudgeon about where you can and can’t go or what activities you can or can’t participate in.

There are some situations where you have no other option but to go about your business unarmed. Most of us have workplaces that by default have a “no guns” policy. Does that mean that if we were to experience violence in the workplace that we couldn’t respond and defend ourselves if given the opportunity? Does it mean that we should quit our jobs? I think not. We should develop a mindset that we are going to fight whenever necessary with whatever tools are available, or our bare hands if needed, in order to survive. If we are worried we don’t have that skillset, we should seek out the training to develop it. I think most of us who understand personal defense would agree that the willingness to fight is the most important factor when it comes to surviving a worst case scenario. With this knowledge, why then do so many of us act like we have to live our lives based on where we can or cannot carry our firearms?

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There are many times where I have been disappointed at the uninformed choices that some establishments have made in regard to their weapons policy. There are also some states that I wish would respect the rights of their people and legalize concealed carry. There are even countries that I would like to visit that ban guns outright. However, if I am interested in enjoying a delicious taco place or taking a trip to Boston or Europe; I’m not going to forego those experiences just because I know my gun won’t be there with me. I refuse to cheat myself out of enjoying life just because I cannot always be armed due to legality or practicality. How many of us enjoy an adult beverage from time to time? That may or may not be an issue legally speaking, depending on where you live; but it certainly isn’t practical or advisable to drink while armed if it can be avoided. Is that really a good reason to skip out on drinks with you friends? That seems to me like a pretty boring way to live your life.

We as responsible citizens should first and foremost be armed with the will to fight and the ability to improvise and overcome even absent our preferred defensive tools. If you don’t have that comfort level with personal defense in general, you really need to get further training. The other option is just sitting at home and bemoaning the injustice, but that isn’t what I view as a proactive solution. Carry your gun when you can, but take your brain with you everywhere; and you will live a fuller, more productive life.

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69 Responses to “Gun Free Zone Woes”
  1. Joe
    Joe

    Mr. Israel,
    First off let me say that was a well most thought out, clearly spoken, and totally useless piece of drivel I have heard recently. There are several reasons why I carry, let me illuminate, my wife, my three kids, and my own safety. I am a veteran and at one time a very fit veteran. My life ‘since I was medically boarded well let’s just say that I had three surgeries last year, I’ve already had one this year. I’m not sure where you live in the great state of Texas, but the area I live in the amount of assaults, robberies, and murders in Bell county alone is staggering. I would suggest you google DPS’s statistics on crime in 2015 alone. The fact that there are numerous threats of domestic terrorism, and the fact that physically I wouldn’t be able to do much to protect myself or my family. There is an old western saying though Mr. Israel, that says “God created man Sam Colt made them equal.” So before you start casting your own thoughts on those positive experiences I want my family to be safe and around to create them and if that means we only go places that allow me to carry then so be it.

    Reply
    • Aaron
      Aaron

      This article has to do with mindset. Your specific circumstances may well limit your ability to defend yourself absent the ability to use your firearm. If that is the case, then your decision to not go places that you can’t carry would make more sense than it would for the vast majority of people who will read this post. That’s called an extenuating circumstance. I am well aware of the assault and robbery statistics in Bell County. I lived there while stationed at Fort Hood for 5 years. As such, when I was legally allowed to, I carried my firearm. But… I worked on Fort Hood everyday, which is obviously a giant gun free zone. I had to go to work everyday without my firearm. Did I wish that weren’t so? Absolutely. Did I have to go to work anyway. Yes. Did it mean I was totally helpless as an able bodied Artillery Captain to defend myself? No. Had I been in the room with Hassan when he shot the place up.. I would have fought if I could have. Would I have faired as well being unarmed? Maybe.. Maybe not.. Depends on the circumstances. But.. Just having had my firearm would not in and of itself had made me any safer on those days. Similarly.. If I forego entering any number of gun free zones simply because something “might happen” that a firearm might be useful for dealing with.. I’m not out of options. I don’t choose to base my entire life around where I can or cannot carry my preferred defensive tools. If I did that, I couldn’t have so much as visited my grandfather in the hospital, which is where I took the picture of the 30.06 posting. You have to live your life, and sometimes that means not having your gun either due to legality or practicality, but that doesn’t mean you are necessarily less safe or less able to fight if the need arises.

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      • Martin Luther
        Martin Luther

        I get your mindset concept. However, we should be all able to agree that being armed is superior in terms of dealing with a deadly threat like the mass shooter example. I worked at 2 jobs that had rules against being armed. I carried anyway. And I prepared myself for the consequences if found out. It’s Big Boy rules: You are responsible for you. As far as the posted signs in business’s go, move to Oklahoma as those signs don’t have the force of law.

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        • Aaron Israel
          Aaron Israel

          Certainly.. And ignoring your company’s policy is certainly your prerogative.. If you understood the mindset piece, that is what I was trying to convey.. I spend plenty of time in Oklahoma.. Especially during football season!

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      • artsbrew
        artsbrew

        well i think your article is a little short sighted and your reply. i will be 70 in a few months. i have taught people to brew their own wine and berr for 30 years, and i am closing my shop at the end of the year. i have a lot of problems from fighting cancer in my 50’s. if my jaw is broken it will not heal. i have been in a few fights in my time and was as you say bless with fast reflexes. i worked security at concerts for many years and got in most of my fights there. never started a fight and never threw the first punch. you say having a firearm when the crazy doc went crazy would not have helped just does not make sense to me. you don’t take a knife to a gun fight and i am sure that means fists are worse. usually it takes a gun to stop a gun, not always but usually. i was assaulted a little while ago. he hit me behind the head and ran to the street out of reach. he was pretty happy with him self, being out of reach with my arms so i kicked him in the nuts. i had my gun on me. he said i kicked him and he did not hit me. we called the cops and i have tape, while it was not on the tape it was clear who was assaulting who. i went to court over that one. i left before the out come to open my business.

        when the time comes and i need a gun which will likely not happen unless i am very unlikely but i live and work in a bad bad place. there have been 2 dead bodies on the street while living here. if i am going some place like a court i leave my gun in the car. it is not a good idea but i am not going to be without any longer then i have to be. i carry everywhere. i will not go to places i cannot carry. why? i will not give them the money, they do not deserve my money. i went to bars a lot when i was younger before i started carrying. now i take pain meds and very rarely have a drink and if i do it is only one. does that mean i cannot carry like Hawaii is doing now. that is bull crap mostly coming from diapercraps. we all make our choices and mine is not to support a place that does not support gun rights. as far as i am concerned those places when something happens like in a bar in florida should be sued. if they take your right then it is their responsibility if something happens. if they take my right to self protection whether it is the government or private business they have taken that responsibility on themselves. I WILL NOT GIVE A BUSINESS MY BUSINESS IF THEY TAKE MY RIGHT TO SELF PROTECTION AWAY. it is the same not giving a business my business if i do not like what they do. a choice and one that i make because there are plenty of business that will not take my right and i am more then happy to give them my money. who knows if a few get sued because of them being hurt or killed maybe there will not be as many no gun places. also if we as a group do not give those folks our money and give it to someone that does not take our right, there might be fewer no gun establishments. we have lost a lot of our freedom in the US, i am not going to allow more to be taken away. also if there are places you are not suppose to have a gun like hospitals, to me concealed means i do not have a gun. who will know? how is carrying a gun into a hospital and then leaving after you are done going hurt someone or even let them know what you are doing. just my view and i certainly would not try and tell anyone else to break a misdemeanor law. we all have to make our own choices and hopefully the government will get out of telling everyone how to live. what made america so great was not lining up the same little boxes in a row. what made it great was allowing individualism. new ideas does not come from everyone thinking a like.

        Reply
        • Scott
          Scott

          I’m lucky to live in the State of Wisconsin. The Dems fought concealed carry, so hard and so long, that when we finally elected a Republican Governor, with GOP majority in both the House and Senate, one of the best CCW laws in the country was enacted.

          No carry signs are basically unenforceable, in fact the first CCW permit holder to fire at a threat was in a place with signs, but they didn’t meet statute and even if they did, the worst is a misdemeanor and that’s after being asked to leave multiple times.

          Employers can’t prohibit employees for having a gun in their car, even if they drive that vehicle as a part of their job and even if the driving is done only on property the company owns or leasees. We can carry in bars, just can’t drink a drop while armed.

          The best is that liability is coded into the statute. If a property owner prohibits you from carrying a weapon, they automatically become liable for your safety from a civil standpoint. If something bad happens and you are without your gun, you can sue the pants off them.

          I wish other states would enact similar legislation. After awhile, property owners would get sick and tired of bring dragged into court and paying out settlements.

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    • Aaron Israel
      Aaron Israel

      Joe, I lived in Bell county for 5 years. There are obviously some crime problems there and that is a good reason to be armed whenever you are legally allowed to be.. However.. Being prepared to efficiently respond to a worst case scenario with a firearm does not make you “safe” from the worst case scenario happening. I think you would agree that the gun free zone signs don’t make the people who post them any safer.. Well it turns out that your firearm is just as inanimate of an object and by itself is not capable of imputing “safety” on you or your family. In fact, if you find yourself using it to defend yourself, you were by definition not safe from that attack, you were just better equipped to respond to it. That may seem like semantics but its an important distinction. Your safety has more to do with your whole mindset and the actions you take or don’t take whether you are armed at the time or not. If you don’t “feel safe” when you are unarmed, then you’ve falsely convinced yourself that the gun is more than just a tool. That problematic thinking is what I’m advocating against, not where you choose to carry or not. The point is.. it’s just one piece of the personal defense puzzle and not worth fixating on.

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    • Alice
      Alice

      Absolutely! I don’t plan my life around where I can and can’t go with my protection. There are enough places that do allow guns that I go there instead! I live in Flint, Mi and I Will carry my weapon wherever I go. I have a disabled son and I’m in poor health myself, with no way to fight back! I pray to God that I never, ever need to use my weapon, but it’s there if I need it!

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      • Junky Plymouth
        Junky Plymouth

        Let’s see if you still feel that way when you are 70. When I see these signs I usually go somehere else because I want to boycott that business but if I have to pee, I go in concealed and leave them with what I think is appropriate, pee!

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  2. Steve
    Steve

    Well, Mr. Israel, it seems I must agree with Joe, perhaps not so vehemently, but yes, I am afraid that I have to agree. Those establishments not allowing my being armed are denying me my second amendment right, and don’t get my money, period. I live in a violent city in the Southwest. In fact, I live in one of the more violent neighborhoods of that city, a place where drive by spree killings and violent home invasions happen almost constantly. I train with edged weapons. I train hand to hand. I have for many years. I like having my weapon with me, thank you very much, and if business don’t appreciate that, they don’t get my business. Call it a clash in ideologies, if you will.

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    • Aaron Israel
      Aaron Israel

      Directly from the blog post: I can understand “voting with your money” so to speak as a way of advocating for your rights, but if you tell me that you don’t go to a place or do things that require you to be unarmed because it makes you less safe; your logic is off.”— Steve, you are describing a political motivation for not supporting a business. That is entirely different than not going in because you don’t have the warm and fuzzies that carrying your gun might provide you. This is an article about mindset, not “voting with your money”. You can and often should do that, if you feel so inclined.

      Reply
      • airgunnerwade
        airgunnerwade

        I suppose you don’t understand how most people that are CCW, ARE politically motivated, due to the assault on our 2nd (and other) Ammendment Rights. I see no problem going to [another] restaurant that serves tacos without the sign on the door. Choice is a freedom, right? (pardon the pun) If one carries concealed, properly, no one should know you are carrying, so personally, I don’t have a problem carrying in establishments with the sigh on the door – although I doubt I would dart the door of said establishment.

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  3. Ed
    Ed

    “Gun Free Zones” are a political myth. If someone wants to take a gun in, they will. If they intend harm, they will recognize the place as a Soft Target. The only way to be truly gun free is to control the entrances with guards and metal detectors. The 30.06 prevents nothing. That is why I choose other restaurants and theaters.

    Reply
  4. Chris
    Chris

    To me, it doesn’t matter whether or not the gun is the most efficient tool for self-defense, or whether or not there are other methods of self defense, or whether or not one has a defensive mindset. (Yes, those things matter, but in the context of the above article’s proposed scenario they do not.) What matters is that I get to decide how I spend my money. I am older (63), and I’ve already seen many of the world’s great museums, and eaten in spectacular restaurants, and traveled to other countries. My life is NOT limited by the choices I make about where to spend my money. Quite the opposite, my life is enriched by my choices. It’s not about whether or not I am able to defend myself with something other than a gun. It is ALL about whether or not I want to give my dollars to a business that thinks so little of my personal safety within their establishment. If I gave them my money, I would feel like I was compromising my values. It would be like entering a strip club to buy a Coke. There are other places where I can buy a Coke without having to compromise my moral values. (Not judging, but if you think strip clubs are OK, that’s fine for you….. they just don’t fit within MY moral paradigm.) Yeah, it’s just my little dollars, and more than likely, it will have little to no impact on that business’s bottom line. But it will have a lot of impact on my ability to look at myself in the mirror each morning. I have standards. I intend to keep them. I won’t support those who don’t share those standards. It’s simple.

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    • Rocky
      Rocky

      This is Concealed Carry – Correct?
      Carry your gun concealed and don’t tell any one about. + if you really have toNOT have your gun on you make sure it is in the car, hidden. I keep my AR pistol hidden in my car at all times.

      Reply
    • John
      John

      Well put Chris. While you are one and I am one, together we have already doubled the buying power that these establishments will not see and it goes on from three. The most important thing is that we stand together for what we believe and not break off as the author suggests because it is then that we truly will lose our rights. Just my 2 cents!!!

      Reply
  5. Andy
    Andy

    I agree with Joe, those signs prohibiting guns by permit holders are meant to be an insult and are taken as such by me, for the thugs they’re merely advertisements for unarmed victims. Mindset is mindset, everywhere all the time.

    Reply
  6. John N Schoen
    John N Schoen

    When I see a sign like this, all I think of is “gun free zone”. Doing business there is tantamount to putting a target on your back, at the mercy of any mass killer! Much rather go to an establishment where possibly several licenced carry people are present.(myself included on occasion).

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  7. Jeff
    Jeff

    Great article. As usual, some WON’T see the point. I’m a new shooter and in the process of getting my LTC. I’m not letting a store owner’s view stop me from shopping where I want to shop. Their store, their opinion. I have no problem respecting that. Good job, and keep it up.

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  8. Mike
    Mike

    I just read your article. A so called gun free zone without security in place to back it up (such as you find in a courthouse or airport for example) is foolish on it’s face. All you do is announce to the criminal element that they now have a safe working environment to commit their crimes. It’s interesting to note that we don’t see a lot of mass shootings at gun ranges. Accidental shootings yes and one incident involving the murder of two victims yes but that is pretty much it. If there were others believe me the media would have been all over it.

    Mass shootings committed by what are now called an active shooter(s) occur in churches and schools and hospitals and malls where there are plenty of unarmed victims ready for slaughter. A common theme among these mass shooters is to kill as many victims as possible before they themselves die (either by law enforcement or by their own hand) in order to achieve notoriety.

    They know that their faces and names will be splashed all over the news and their goal to become infamous will be achieved.

    Speaking of gun free zones, here is my policy on those. I make a choice when I encounter one. If there is no security system in place to ensure compliance (restaurant, hospital, etc) I have to decide whether to violate the law or avoid the establishment. Those are the only two choices available to me. In the case of a hospital or medical center where I need to go for treatment or to pick up medication for example, I violate the law because of necessity. My necessity, not theirs.

    I won’t become a target or a victim. That includes my family. I won’t be put in a position of having to beg for my or my families lives. Just won’t happen.
    As far as being armed goes, remember this; It’s better to have and not need – than to need and not have. Also, when SECONDS count – the police are only minutes away.

    And finally, here is my view on those who choose to carry. Carry concealed even if your state allows open carry. The reason is obvious. You don’t want to announce to the world that you have a weapon. You don’t have eyes in the back of your head. A person intent on doing harm will focus on you first and will try and take you out as a threat. You then provide him or her or them with an additional weapon to do his or her or their deed. Carry concealed. That way you can present a surprise to anyone intent on doing harm.

    Prohibition didn’t work for alcohol, the war against drugs was lost long ago. Taking guns away from law abiding citizens falls into the same category.

    That’s my view.

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  9. Chuck F
    Chuck F

    I disagree with the not “voting with my wallet ” mentality, and there are some situations where I will willingly not carry because I would like to enjoy an adult beverage. Your article seems out of place on this site, perhaps you will find a more receptive audience over @ DemoUnderground to preach to. It is about 2A freedom and the conscious decision to support your convictions. …or not. You do you and I will do me.

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  10. Mike
    Mike

    While I respect your opinion, why would I go somewhere that doesn’t respect my rights , yet I have to respect their rights? I do not feel that I have deprived myself of anything. No food, wares, or scenery is worth my ability to have the tools I need to protect me and my family period.

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  11. Charlie
    Charlie

    Wow…I very rarely if ever respond to any articles, but Aaron you are soooo far off the mark here.
    I am totally surprised that this way of thinking would come from you or PDN.
    As I see it, we have really only two ways to support our beliefs, our standards, the things we hold important.
    One is to vote for the candidates that we feel stand firm on those issues.
    Two is to vote with our dollars. That is to not support businesses, companies or candidates with our money that are infringing on our rights or beliefs.

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    • David M
      David M

      You’re right Charlie, and that includes Aaron & PDN !! It may be of course that PDN are deliberately shaking the tree, but somehow the article does not quite ring true to that concept – sadly for PDN !

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  12. Kevin
    Kevin

    Well Aaron,it really does boil down to “experience”. Once you’ve been in a work place setting labeled a 30.06/30.07 “gun free zone”,especially as the employee at the register forced to hand over the cash with an obviously loaded revolver alternately shoved against your nose and spinal cord, your personal “experience” will change your perspective forever. Not that the “experience” ends when the thug finally leaves because then you get to answer all the questions pertaining to the “experience” included but not limited to ” Are you sure you aren’t complicit in this crime ” by the authorities and your snowflake bent employer,over and over again.I’d venture immediately that this has never happened to you and that if it ever does you will be acutely aware of and be able to expound upon the distinct taste of crow.

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  13. Jeff K
    Jeff K

    Refuse to be a victim in an “Unarmed Victim Zone”. To hell with the signs. Metal detectors, etc., they don’t have ANYTHING there I need.

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  14. Tom Culpepper
    Tom Culpepper

    While I somewhat agree with this article on engaging your mind, I disagree with it due to those business’s that are gun free invite criminals as they are making themselves a target.

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  15. Chiefton
    Chiefton

    I find it incredible that the courts will not allow a business to refuse service to an openly gay person under rulings that this is a violation of their constitutional rights yet they allow those same businesses to put up a sign that denies a person access in violation of their constitutional right. The hypocrisy of this is staggering.

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    • Corey
      Corey

      Chieftain excellent point. I actually never thought of that correlation before but you are correct, gross hypocrisy

      Reply
  16. David P Sargent
    David P Sargent

    Your point is valid and one that I would have held to in absolute terms if not for chronic illness which permits me to see the perspective of those who are limited physically in terms of response. When traveling out with friends, I know that I will respond to a life-threatening circumstance and owing to my own limitations it will more than likely not completely succeed. I would not have my significant others experience that guilt, should I die in trying to buy them some time to escape, if it can be avoided. I’ll vote with my wallet, ensure the ignorant hear my reasoning in polite and professional terms they may be able to understand and I will protect my loved ones.
    But it does suck when I’m encouraged to carry at church but cannot to my favorite theater!

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  17. Marshall A. Dyson
    Marshall A. Dyson

    Though I have to admit I like a lot of what you said, my problem is I take offense to the businesses leaving me to the possible mercy of a near-do-well. If they are denying me my right to carry, where is the security to ensure my family’s safety. I have no problem defending myself with a minimum amount of tools, but I want every advantage when it comes to my family.

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  18. Jeff K
    Jeff K

    I refuse to be a victim in an “Unarmed Victim Zone”; to hell with those signs. I f somewhere has metal detectors, etc., they do not have anything I need or want; too many other choices. Yes, I vote with my dollars, it is my choice not to support businesses that are anti self defense.

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  19. Roger
    Roger

    Any place which has a sign out forbidding me to enter with my legally carried concealed weapon is telling me that they consider me a threat to them and their patrons even though statistics show that concealed carriers are the most law abiding people in the country. The arrogance of such a position and the assumption that their sign will keep their patrons safe disgusts me. It is their right to do so of course, but I make it a point to never willingly encourage or reward stupidity. If they don’t want my money fine. There are intelligent business owners who are competing with them and those are the people I’ll do business with. I don’t get mad but I do discriminate against fools. Too bad more people don’t follow my lead.

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  20. Bill
    Bill

    By posting a “Gun Free” sign does a restaurant or other public establishment make itself legally liable for your safety? If I have a concealed-carry permit and cannot protect myself from attack because a restaurant has declared itself a “Gun Free” establishment can I sue that restaurant for failing to provide protection for its customers?

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    • David M
      David M

      Bill – agreed 😉 More of us need to take this stance and be as willing to litigate as the leftist brigade. Maybe a “Law” requiring GFZ’s to post a notice admitting “All liability for the safety of clientelle and or workforce from any cause whatsoever ” would make some rethink their attitudes.

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  21. BUURGA
    BUURGA

    ‘Run your life around where you can carry you firearm’? You’re damn right you do. What does this nitwit think concealed carry is about? This is the old concealed carry is really a hobby crap. If your taste buds are running your life and overruling your self defense life THEN THE DAMN RESTAURANT HAS TO GO, not the right to defend yourself. Concealed carry is not a convenience of the moment. The intimation in the article is that concealed carry is in itself somewhat unhealthy and should be kept ‘under control’ for the sake of the ‘good life’, mental health…….the list goes on. What rot.

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  22. Michael Murphy
    Michael Murphy

    The mindset we must escape is one of justifying “Gun Free Zone” legislation as legal. Our state and federal representatives have a clear framework within which they are swore to remain with regard to laws they may justifiably create and expect citizens to comply; it’s the Constitution of the United States. All laws seeking to remove a citizens right carry, own or purchase weapons falls squarely outside this framework and is therefore void. If we wish to keep any of our rights we must understand this. Otherwise, they will continue to erode.

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  23. Gary
    Gary

    Mr. Israel,
    You do realize, that a sign on a building such as this assures criminals that every one inside is “ripe for the picking”.
    I realize that by default, anyone performing a criminal act is not thinking in their right mind but I believe these signs are an invitation.
    Another question – does a private citizen have the right to to sidestep my constitutional right? As far as I am concerned this type of signage is unlawful by federal standards.

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  24. Dan
    Dan

    Sure did not expect this type of language coming from this site. I would speak to the manager of the business, state how much you love their “tacos”, and why you can no longer do business with them. If enough of us do this, it will have an impact…

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  25. Ken
    Ken

    Know your State law! In a State such as mine, there are a few specifically prohibited places that you cannot lawfully carry concealed. That said, businesses that just slap up a “No guns allowed” signs do NOT have the force of law behind them. If you are asked to leave, you must because of the trespassing law but you can carry concealed otherwise despite the sign. The bottom line is read and study your State’s concealed carry laws.

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  26. Larry
    Larry

    I totally get the mindset, and no, my side arm is not a magic talisman. To my mind, “gun free zone” = soft target. I refuse to be the latter, not to mention that I believe them to be unconstitutional company policies. God forbid I should be caught in an active shooter or business robbery situation, I want the odds on my side. Because they are rarely reported no one can say just how many times a scumbag changed plans or was stopped when confronted by a good guy with a gun. No, I go where I want and carry everywhere I can, Period.

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  27. Michael
    Michael

    The author makes a fundamentally erronious assumption in his article. The author assumes all people who have concealed carry permits, or who want to “open carry” in their favorite restaurant, movie theatre, or other public places, avoid places that prohibit firearms simply because they are concerned about their own personal safety. That assumption is probably patently false for most of us today. Yes – many of us work in “Gun Free” zones (I wonder how many of the office workers “conceal carry” in their brief cases or back packs; and how many of the blue collar workers “carry concealed” under their shirts or in the back packs, lunch boxes, and probably almost everyone leaves their firearm securely stored in their vehicle while they are on the job, etc.?); however, I bet there are many people who choose where to spend their disposable income as a “political tool”, and possibly they contact those places of businesses and let them know they lost business simply because they chose to respect the rights of sheeple not to be “disconcerted or uncomfortable” because someone might be legally carrying a firearm, over the rights of law abiding, politically focused individuals like myself. Here in Texas I choose not to “open carry” because I feel it puts me at a disadvantage if I am somewhere and a “bad guy” wants to commit a crime. I might be his first target! However, institutions and businesses that choose not to allow “Concealed Carry” and/or “Open Carry” are in my opinion short-sighted, probably have not thoroughly researched this issue, or worse, have and choose to be far to the left of me and my family and friends in our personal values, thus I take my money elsewhere. Does this cause a business to fail? Well, not just because I don’t go there, but as more and more conscientious and law abiding individuals become ready to vote with their pocket book, it will. It seems those of us more conservatively oriented in our values are just now learning what the politically left have understood and practiced for years: Every vote counts and boycotts and other forms of legal protest work. So shop where you want, but remember, millions of Texans worked extremely hard to finally get concealed carry and open carry legalized. Patronize those businesses that allow it, and let them know you appreciate it. And those businesses that do not allow it (as is their right under that same law) – let them know you have chosen to take your business elsewhere. Just a note – I love Whataburger. It has been my favorite “fast food” restaurant for years. However since that corporation chose not to allow open carry in their restaurants “so as to not make their “other” customers uncomfortable”, I nor any of my family members, have crossed the threshhold of their stores. And each January I write to their corporate office reminding them that another “Whataburger-less” year has passed for us. Has it made a difference? Maybe, maybe not, but it is a simople, easy sacrifice to make. It’s kind of a 2nd Amendment thing! Semper Fidelis.

    Reply
    • David M
      David M

      Well-said Michael – exactly my own sentiments. May I wish you and yours a very Happy Christmas and New Year 2021. SemperFi 😉

      Reply
  28. Gary
    Gary

    To the maximum extent possible, I vote with my dollars. Those who patronize the “GFZ” businesses support their continuation of that policy. Those businesses are free to make their choice and we are free to choose to spend our money elsewhere. They’ll never know why they’re loosing money unless you send receipts from their competitors attached to a nice letter explaining you chose based upon their “GFZ” policy. Have a nice day.

    Reply
    • MILT LANCE
      MILT LANCE

      I’m in agreement. I give my money to the ‘good guy’s. It’s my choice and right.

      Reply
  29. Mike
    Mike

    Having traveled all over the country, and having seen where and where not to go, my first line of defense is using common sense to avoid the areas that I should not be in…..no matter how good the tacos are, especially if my rights to the Second Amendment are infringed. I carry everywhere it is legal and like so many others, do my best to avoid those that make it illegal by posting the 30.06 sign. I try not to break the law as I am a law abiding citizen. I have gone to the manager of 4 establishments that posted the 30.06 and now the 30.07 signs. Three of the four removed the signs after lengthy discussions, but the fourth place only took down the 30.06 sign, leaving the 30.07. Reason being is that the owner also had a CHL, and fully understood the dangers of carrying unconcealed, in a holster that had little or no constraint to prevent anyone other than guns owner, removing it from the holster and using it in a negative manner. I do not care to carry openly, my personal preference, and have, on occasion carried in an establishment bearing the 30.06 sign when there was no other option, and I felt I needed the gun in case of a SHTF scenario came about.

    Reply
    • mike smith
      mike smith

      I carry to protect my wife and home, this is a saying i used by being a LEO for many years. I would rather be tried by 12 than be carried by 6

      Reply
  30. Henry Walker
    Henry Walker

    You are using the Texas 30.06 sign. You also need the 30.07 to make “no carry in here” legal. Do it correctly, or do not do it at all as I detest folks that use “half truths” for their examples. 30.06 says you cannot carry concealed. 30.07 says you can not open carry. Very few places have 06 and 07 (Ikea and almost all medical institutions). Most places, including Walmart, only have 07 signs if any at all. Most folks (in Houston and area) prefer to carry concealed as we like the bad guy to be surprised and we do not want the “shoot me first” sign on our backs. I am usually somewhat mostly concealed.

    Reply
  31. Arthur Burke
    Arthur Burke

    Your assumption that one can effectively oneself in a no-guns-allowed (NGA) environment assumes that you live in a utopia. Many armed attacks have occurred in environments claiming no guns allowed. Luby’s Cafeteria on October 16, 1991 suffered a brutal senseless massacre when George Hennard, drove his pickup truck through the front window of the restaurant, then quickly shot and killed 23 people, and wounded 27 others. Luby’s had a no guns allowed environment. One responsibly armed individual would have saved many lives by simply ending the attack.

    Limiting defensive options is akin to taking tools out of a craftsman’s toolbox but still expecting him to do the same job. I understand the hammer metaphor but don’t limit MY toolbox.

    Reply
  32. Gary Truckey
    Gary Truckey

    I absolutely concur with your insistence that we cannot allow ourselves to be dependent solely on a firearm for our personal defense. I embrace the concept that we all must develop ourselves as best we can in all aspects of self defense. However, (comma) I’d have to disagree to a certain extent about patronizing (in both senses of the word) establishments that deny my Second Amendment rights. I choose to be a curmudgeon because with the oncoming “regime”; we shall need to stand up for our 2A rights more than ever.

    Reply
  33. Neil Sing
    Neil Sing

    I carry my conceal handgun in some gun free zones and if they see it I will then take it to my vehicle. I will only get in trouble if I refuse to take it to my vehicle.

    Reply
  34. David M
    David M

    I think your reasoning is very flawed here. Whilst we wait for commonsense to penetrate the liberal anti-gun mentality sadly life with all its challenges goes on regardless of whether or not we insist on being best enabled to defend ourselves , our loved ones, and even those around us who prefer to remain amongst the “sheep for slaughter” hoping “someone else” will have the guts to save them !
    To deliberately place myself amongst the target sheep ( for they are the ones most likely to become the real targets – which criminal chooses to attack the group best known to be capable of “seeing him off” ? ) is just not going to happen, trust me, Hell will freeze over first 😉

    Reply
  35. Franklin
    Franklin

    Mr. Israel, we must each make our own choices. It is obvious that you have chosen the easier, more personally convenient route and support those that work against other peoples’ Second Amendment rights. I respect your right to choose a traitorous position. However, I hold no respect for the position you chose and seemingly brag about. I suspect that you will not even go as far as to spit in the direction of those that would pervert and destroy The Constitution of The United States of America.

    Reply
  36. Dee Dee
    Dee Dee

    It is an interesting study when a 5 year old column such as this bubbles to the surface again. Perhaps the author was just venting from some recent event in his life? He’s placing a blanket assumption on virtually everyone else regarding disposition. What an absurd waste of my time to read the column.
    To respond: I am fortunate to live in a state where signage is void of legal enforcement. To be honest, I don’t really see any purpose for signs as shown in the article. Seriously, if you are carrying concealed, WHO KNOWS???? My issue is that if a business has such disregard for their clientele, I don’t care to give them my business. I have much better things to do with my time and money. In this interesting year of government tyranny over a mild flu, I am the same way about face masks. Again, I live in a state where the governor has essentially made all local mandates null. Nonetheless, there are some businesses which are openly hostile to people not hiding their identity and humanity by wearing a petri dish on their faces. It is an amazing phenomenon as most businesses are struggling to survive and you would think they would embrace each customer walking through their door. So yeah, I don’t give those locations my business either. There are always businesses that will unconditionally welcome my support. I actually find some hidden gems when I drive past businesses that do not respect me, my safety, or my rights.
    And yes, Aaron, I most certainly do think twice before frequenting a business that does not respect my rights and freedom.

    Reply
    • Dee Dee
      Dee Dee

      I would like to add that anytime we find ourselves rationalizing and sacrificing our integrity to accommodate or tolerate restrictions, mandates, or infringements on our liberties, we may as well lay down and let others walk right over us. Reason is one thing. But to write several paragraphs trying to rationalize going to a taco joint with a gun free zone sign — man, there are some issues there.

      Reply
  37. Russ
    Russ

    While your “mindset” has a point, my safety is much better served with having my EDC. I just ignore the notice. “Forgiveness is always easier than permission”! The odds of anyone discovering that I’m armed is probably the same or less than the odds of needing to use it.

    Reply
  38. Warren Murray
    Warren Murray

    You are having a better bad day if you think this way. Most of the shootings occurred in gun free zones, schools, church and hospitals…

    Reply
  39. Yorak Hunt
    Yorak Hunt

    My mind set is that I don’t want a single penny of mine going to an enemy of the second amendment. I stopped going to Buffalo Wild wings (which I loved) over their pinko commie gun policy & my life is just as good as it ever was. I drive AROUND slave states like Illinois if I’m traveling & don’t care if it adds mileage to my trip. I don’t avoid “gun Free zones” due to the fact that I’m safer while carrying, I avoid them because I DON’T WANT COMMIE SCUM GETTING MY MONEY! How good do those hot wings taste when you hear the place you spent money at just cut a $500,000 check to hand gun control INC.?

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hello Yorak,

      That’s a great question!

      The ‘Ask an Expert’ section is currently for members to our online community. We do have a promotional offer if you are interested. This would include access to expert advice (like this), plus discounts, hours of Premium videos, etc. Please feel free to take a look. You can message us right back with your question if you decide to become a member and you will have a response within 1-2 business days from our experts!

      Please follow the steps below to receive the annual membership at the introductory rate:

      1. Click on the email link:
      2. Click on the Premium Membership offer. https://go.personaldefensenetwork.com/C25451
      3. The Checkout page will display your Premium Membership purchase.
      4. Fill in your Billing Details and create an account password.
      5. Fill in your debit/credit card information.
      6. Finish by clicking Complete Order.

      If you have any further questions, please contact Customer Service at 1-855-231-0653 at your earliest convenience, or chat with us on our site.

      We greatly appreciate your business!

      Sincerely,

      Ayan
      Personal Defense Network Video Membership

      Reply
  40. Scott Miller
    Scott Miller

    I’m extremely disappointed that PDN would permit your article on their website. Would you frequent an establishment that posted any of the following signs : “No handicapped people allowed”, “No [add your race/ethnicity here] allowed”, “No [add your nationality here]”,”No knives, pepper spray, Tactical Pens, or any other weapon allowed”???
    I respect the right of the store owner to make a statement with entrance policies…and I will spend my money accordingly, i.e. not in establishments which post signs which are diametrically opposed to my opinion. If more gun owners would exercise their right of choice and be more discriminating in the businesses they choose to support with their purchases, perhaps more store owners would think twice before attempting to disenfranchise their potential customers.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hello Scott,

      That’s a great question!

      The ‘Ask an Expert’ section is currently for members to our online community. We do have a promotional offer if you are interested. This would include access to expert advice (like this), plus discounts, hours of Premium videos, etc. Please feel free to take a look. You can message us right back with your question if you decide to become a member and you will have a response within 1-2 business days from our experts!

      Please follow the steps below to receive the annual membership at the introductory rate:

      1. Click on the email link:
      2. Click on the Premium Membership offer. https://go.personaldefensenetwork.com/C25451
      3. The Checkout page will display your Premium Membership purchase.
      4. Fill in your Billing Details and create an account password.
      5. Fill in your debit/credit card information.
      6. Finish by clicking Complete Order.

      If you have any further questions, please contact Customer Service at 1-855-231-0653 at your earliest convenience, or chat with us on our site.

      We greatly appreciate your business!

      Sincerely,

      Ayan
      Personal Defense Network Video Membership

      Reply
  41. Jim
    Jim

    There’s plenty of good restaurants that allow CCW so just go to one that does. Also, I do not shop in the indoor malls that bar guns. However, what I do is shop in the big store in the mall by entering and leaving through the outside doors. The ones without any Gun Signs. Or you can communicate with the owner about the restrictions. Two years ago a restaurant one of our favorite restaurants one day had a “No Gun Zone” sign in the front door. I told my wife to go in and order our food for takeout. I sat at one of the outside tables that were close to the front door and windows, all glass. The owner came out and asked why I didn’t come inside. I told him because of the sign, that I Carry and do not go inside the “Zones”. He said “You can come in if I let you. You’re a good customer and I don’t want to lose you.” I explained that as long as that sign is on the door I cannot come in with my weapon. He said “I have to check that out.” The next week I saw that he had taken off the signs.!!

    So I’m a 76 year old man who years ago if pushed to protect myself I could easily at 195 and benching 300 lbs. But now when I see images of those five guys attacking one guy I say “That will not happen to me.” So I Carry all the time so that will never happen. Granted, I probably will not find myself in that position BUT who knows for sure.!!

    We all know the crazed idiot that wants to kill will seek out that Gun Free Zone, knowing there’s less chances of being stopped. I refuse to put myself in any of those places the idiot is seeking. No favorite sandwich or meal is worth it. Even if the odds are very slim.

    BTW, I live in Tennessee and travel to Pennsylvania at times. I Carry the entire trip except for a small 20 miles drive through a slender part of Maryland. Before I get to the Maryland border I have to lock my pistol and ammo in my trunk. After driving into PA, I then stop put my pistol back on and continue on.!! :o)

    Reply
  42. John
    John

    I am able defend myself and my family member against most single attackers without resorting to drawing my weapon. But the true facts are that 99% of all attacks are commited by groups of people. So unless you think you are chuck norris or jackie chan in a movie it never ends well for the victims. When a group of large angry men attack people having a peaceful dinner because they don’t like your color, appreance religion or whatever reason. Than its time for mr colt to equalize the situation and damm the consqunces. Just know that if I am on the jury,,, you will go free and screw the snowflakes, liberals, democrats. Burn down your own towns, it will serve you right.

    Reply
  43. JD
    JD

    I think the point should be to let those places who ban concealed carry on their premises should be sent a letter telling them they are losing your business (and your like minded friends) by basing their ban on false facts. I no longer shop Dicks’s Sporting goods (had bought a rifle & shotgun there previously) and no longer buy Levi’s jeans. Let them know of your displeasure and tell your friends don’t buy from them.

    Reply
  44. Harry Frank
    Harry Frank

    With one exception, It has never occurred to me to avoid travel or patronage because of carry limitations. I don’t knowingly or willingly go to dangerous places. Stupidity is a fatal condition, and a concealed gun is no cure.

    Reply
  45. Jack Coberly
    Jack Coberly

    Well stated. My wife and I own a handgun for home protection but we don’t carry it on us or travel with it. As a matter of fact I don’t belong to a gun organization and voted against carrying a concealed weapon in Colorado a few years back when I lived there. I don’t fear the govt is taking away my second amendment rights and don’t feel I need to carry a gun with me at all times. I am a coach and would feel it unnecessary and potentially dangerous. I don’t mean this to be a political reply, but the writer hit the nail on the head and I agree. Why restrict the freedoms we do have with travel and the enjoyment of the things we like because of the fear of something that probably won’t happen.
    I am 77 years old and started Krav Maga when I was 75 so I can protect myself and family without a gun. I am at this time preparing to test for my black belt which includes gun and knife defense and how to handle a gun and knife in stressful situations. I agree that we should not be so obsessed with our guns that we fail to enjoy the things we love to do, the things we love to eat or the places we wish to visit. Actually there is no guarantee that even carrying a gun will protect you in many situations. I have had my say and as a Vietnam veteran I can say it’s better to live and enjoy life that live in fear.

    Reply