PDN Contributor Chris Fry of M.D.T.S. Training looks at utilizing the carbine as an intermediate-force option, or what we call direct-action combatives. This may be in a situation where we are not justified in using lethal force, or where the carbine has a malfunction or stoppage, and we need to use the carbine as an impact tool. In other words, not our usual carbine training drills!

Paddle or Spear Grip

As part of our self-defense training, the first thing to master is how to grip the carbine (or any other long arm) to maximize its effectiveness when striking with it. The Paddle Grip starts with the carbine mounted in the shoulder. Rotate your hands backwards so both thumbs point at you. By assuming this grip, the carbine is turned into a spear.

Bayonet Grip

If you have a retention issue, which should be practiced for during carbine training drills, utilize the Bayonet Grip. Bring the long arm down and clamp it underneath your strong-side arm. Next, bring the strong-side elbow up a bit and drop the stock into your strong hand. The support hand is on the barrel and both thumbs point forward. Spear your target with the muzzle.

Striking Methods

Using both grips, Chris demonstrates four striking methods. The first is striking directly with the muzzle. The second is striking with the heel or toe of the buttstock. The third brings the long gun forward and strikes with the front sight or tip of the muzzle. The fourth is a cross-face strike with the middle of the long gun. With the Spear Grip, strike with the charging handle or top of the gun. With the Bayonet Grip, strike with the base of the magazine. Integrate these strikes into your carbine training drills.

Chris has several more training videos and articles, and PDN has many more rifle training videos.