Carrying Firearms in a Vehicle

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Carrying a firearm in your vehicle can be difficult and uncomfortable, but there are plenty of options available for your preferences or unique circumstances. The way you carry your gun in public while you walk around may not be the way you would carry while in your vehicle, so Rob Pincus discusses several carry methods you can choose, from hip holsters and fanny packs to shoulder straps and compatible under-dash clips.

Whether you prefer easy access into the glove compartment or you like to keep the gun strapped to your hip when you’re strapped in behind the wheel, the choice is yours.

Discussion
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34 Responses to “Carrying Firearms in a Vehicle”
  1. Chris MacTraining

    I have watched alot of Rob’s videos and I have enjoyed them. I firmly believe that any, and all training is a good thing. Rather the training is a refresher to training you have allready had, or its something new its all good. Carrying a firearm is a very serious responsiblity and I think CCW holders owe to themselfs, and other law abiding citizens to keep their firearm skills sharp.

    REFUSE TO BE A VICTIM
    NEVER GIVE UP THE FIGHT

    Reply
  2. Herminiov34

    totally cool, in todays world it is better to have if you need one than to not have one if you need one. If you do have one remember in order to defend yourself or family, you need ammo, unlike the embassys in Cario, guns but no ammo. not smart. clinton as potus had the same idea.

    Reply
  3. jwhisok

    I like a J Frame S&W with an ankle holster.  I find the hand gun within very easy reach and retain the ability to get into and out of the vehicle when stopping to eat, re-fuel, or use the restrooms.

    Reply
  4. TXCHL

    As i understand it, here in TX we cannot carry a pistol in plain view. Is this not the case in other states? I’ve seen seat holsters that mount the firearm in plain sight, and this video discusses similar setups as viable options but I’ve always discounted them due to TX law. I’ve found that in situations like these generally speaking most states have more or less the same requirements, and in the event that they differ TX normally has the more “carry friendly” of the two… So the idea of carrying a pistol mounted to the dash doesn’t seem like it would be legal in most states. Am I wrong in understanding the TX law? Or are there states that allow this type of carry?

    Reply
    • Bobcall

      Arizona, for one, allows open carry.  That is you do not have to have a carry permit if the weapon is carried in the open and is visable to others.  I also live in Texas and Oklahoma and yo cannot carry a weapon in a vehicle without a concealed cary permit unless you are traveling to or from a shooting range, hunting area, moving your household, or taking the weapon to a gunsmith.  The weapon cannot be loaded when in a vehicle and preferrably carried in the trunk where is is not accesssible to the occupants of the vehicle.

      Reply
    • Garoc4202003

      I live in Texas and I have a friend that is a cop and he told me that you may carry your gun in your car as long as it is concealed and nothing can be chambered.

      Reply
      • Buzz

        –wait…even a CHL holder can’t have a handgun with a chambered round-?  What if he carries a revolver-?  I don’t remember hearing this, but it IS important to keep it concealed.

        Reply
      • Ray Callahan

        Not necessarilly true.  I also live in Texas and as long as it is concealled, it is legal.  It can be loaded.  A paper or rag covering it in the seat next to you makes it legal and you do not need a license to carry it that way.  Also, there is no longer a requirement to notify the officer you have it, but I do think it is a good idea to do so.  If you have a concealled license, when he runs your driver license, he immediately knows if you have a carry license.  An acceptable method of notification is to say” Officer, I have a concealled carry license and am carrying.  What would you like me to do?”  Never say “I have a gun.”  They appreciate that and it might make the stop easier.  He may disarm you, but he will give it back after his business is completed.  Always be respectful.  You can not carry in plain view anywhere the public can see it unless you are legally hunting. I carry a .40 cal S&W Sigma with 15 rounds in a “In the waste band holster” and the holster lets me tuck in a dress shirt.  Only a very small belt hook is exposed and I cover it with my cell phone.  Even my wife can not tell if I am carrying.  True I can not pull it instantly, but I can get to it quickly.  This is an acceptable compromise for me.  I have tried several of the hoslters in the video and do not like any of them.  They are too “Cowboy for me”
        Ray C.  Former commercial pilot with FAA authorization to carry as a pilot.  San Antonio.

        Reply
        • TxCHL2

          Technically the requirement to notify a LEO is still there, the punishment for not doing so is what was removed.

          Reply
    • Larryray68

      Here in Wyoming, open carry is allowed and a permit is not needed for concealed carry.  Wyoming allows weapons to be carried in vehicles, period.  Different states have all kinds of different rules and if I need to travel thru other states, I always check for the latest on the states I need to travel through.

      Reply
      • Robert Roylance

        I like the idea of open-carry, however what do you think of every state having different “DRIVING LAWS”.  Why can’t these UNITED STATES get their heads on straight and get gun laws that are the same in “ALL” states.
          Dayton, Ohio 

        Reply
  5. David Daly

    In some states, open carry becomes concealed carry the moment you get in the car with the gun. Also, something that Rob did not address is proper muzzle control when deploying the firearm. For instance, the shoulder holster – when pulling the gun from the shoulder holster while standing, you can sweep the muzzle in an arc in such a way that the muzzle describes an arc down and in front of you and back up into the firing position. In a car, there is no way to avoid sweeping your opposite arm (without raising it above your shoulder or head), or your legs in the seated position.  In the heat of the moment that could be the time that an AD could occur and you could shoot yourself.  Should be addressed in the video.  Also, more time could be spent on left-handed carry.

    Reply
    • bigbadbob

      Proper handling will prevent an AD.  It should be a habit to never place the finger inside the trigger guard until ready to shoot, period.  In other words aim, place finger in position and then pull.  Many people do not practice this and it is critical to preventing AD.

      Reply
    • Ken

      Yes I agree, but in New York State everything has to be concealed all of the time in any location, so external mounting is out for me. A cross draw would be my best option. Even if the tip of your holster is showing from under your coat, you could get into trouble.

      Reply
  6. Rmcfa23125

    That magazine pouch behind the passengers seat that is built into many cars is a great place unless you are going to have kids in the backseat

    Reply
  7. Blaster

    Vert Helpful, I use a Biobetric Safe in my vechile. When i need to lock it up but when i am traveling i have it in a soft seat holster that sits between my seats and is out of site as well as very east to get ahold of it will nit fly about durring suden stops and is Conceled at all times by New York laws . If you do not have the FIREARMS AND WEAPONS LAWS BOOK FOR YOUR SATE IT’S A MUST HAVE.aND MAKE SURE TO GET EACH YEARS UPDATES AS WELL. A word froom the wise to civer your ass in your State. 

    And always rember to let any Peace office KNOW that i have a weapon in my Vechial and when asked to present your Drivers license and registration also Present your CCW Permit as well so your Covered BY NEW YORK LAW..  

    My 2 bit’s that just work. now that was for my truck. In my Sprots car i use a shoulder holster that is very easy to concel as well as get to ASAP.

    Reply
  8. Dr Gr8eyes

    Excellent presentation. 
    Consider parenthetically addressing the left handed shooter. 

    Thanks,

    jp

    Reply
  9. Jmhillman02

    1.  It doesn’t make sense to me that he is discussing racking a round while carrying a revolver.  Shouldn’t he be carrying an ACP?

    2.  I personally carry my Glock without a round in the chamber.  That was a decision I made when I first started to carry.  I have small children.  I carry to protect them.  I am also very serious about protecting them from the danger of the firearm.  When I am not carrying it is locked up.  When I am carrying, I am concerned about the possibility of a child bumping the weapon and causing an accidental discharge.  I want the safety of an additional step of racking the weapon before it can be fired to minimize the risk of accidental discharge.  I know it takes more time than just drawing and firing.  I dry fire to practice the steps.  As to the added risk of a misscycled round during racking, I have fired thousands of rounds through the weapons and never had a round misscycle.  If one does, my reaction will be to rack again.

    Reply
  10. Chris Temple

    For me my IWB holster in the 3:00 position is normally fine in the car, and out of it. I hate seat belts for personal reasons and never wear it to be in the way. Some times on longer trip, it can also be handy to use my center console compartment which is right beside my hand.

    Reply
  11. Tom

    As a big guy, my preferred carry is a belly band worn chest high.  My gun sits in a position similar to a shoulder rig for easy access and is comfortable enough to wear all day.  Easily concealed under a loose shirt, I carry a small semi-auto and spare mag.  Works equally well in or out of the car. 

    Reply
  12. Garreth

    For those of you, like me, who do not want a permanent installation of a holster in your vehicle, there are holsters that clamp onto the panels on the bottom half of the dash that work very well.  Do a Google search and you’ll find them!

    Reply
  13. 50 CAL

    Most of the state of California is a non-CC state especially the most dangerous parts of the state.  The California law does not allow carrying a weapon in the car unless the weapon is in a locked case with the clip (ammo) in a different location ( weapon in the trunk and ammo in the glove compartment).  If a person is pulled over by the law and a weapon is anywhere in the car you, my friend, are going to jail, if you are not shot first.  No one is safe in California except the criminals that carry regardless of the law.  Even going to the range for practice is taking your freedom into jeopardy.  God help anyone that lives in California because we are doomed!!!!!

    Reply
    • MI

      That reminds me of the law abiding person who didnt bring her gun into a restruant because it was restricted, and then her parents were shot infront of her when a maniac attacked said restraunt. Criminals have a saying about firearms in illegal circumstances “rather be caught with one, than without one”. Id say take a page from them. Im in Arizona so everyone can conceal, but when i travel, i dont give a shit about a states views, im not dying because some limp wrist wont let me have my six shooter. Molon Labe.

      Reply
  14. Judy

    Would securing a firearm under the dash, as he does using that tan colored disc, be considered as concealment?  I have a permit to carry concealed, but we cannot carry openly.

    Reply
  15. OneArmyVet

    I use IWB at 12:30-1 o’clock.  Seated, the muzzle slides into the hip crease so I don’t really have a problem.  As far as access, In Missouri, in a vehicle, I can move my shirt between the grip and myself to aid expediency (and comfort/sweat) and not worry about brandishing – you see it looking down into MY vehicle, that’s not brandishing in Missouri; the catch is assuring to move the shirt back out when existing a vehicle or you may well brandish – but this becomes habit just like moving vehicle keys to the pocket.

    In terms of muzzle sweep… if you don’t have target acquisition the finger isn’t on trigger anyway, right?  Trigger Discipline is as important a practice as any other movement in one’s full motion from draw to target acquisition.

    Reply
  16. Ken

    Rob, I agree with the holster options for carrying your firearm while in a vehicle, the only thing I don’t agree with is the holster that’s mounted under the dash, and the reason being is because what if you are carjacked, and the assailant comes up to the drivers side quickly, and your window is down (as I often drive while in the city) and presents a gun and forces you to get out. If you try to go to reach for your firearm, (BAM) he see’s it, and shoots you. At least if the firearm is on you, you will be able to get out of the vehicle, and as he’s entering your vehicle, you’ll then be able to quickly pull your firearm. Not to mention, if you’re going out on a date with your wife, and you go someplace that has valet service, and you forget your firearm………(you get the picture I’m sure) For me, in my personal choice, would not ever want my firearm off of me for that exact reason if there’s a carjacking.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      HI Miguel. If what you’re worried about is ammo “cooking off” and the gun shooting, the temperature inside a car cannot get hot enough for that to happen. In tests the ammunition would have to get hotter than 375-400 degrees before it would go off. The bigger issue is taking the gun from hot to cold over and over. This can potentially allow condensation to form inside the case rendering the ammunition useless. There is no exact formula for when this happens and often never happens but is a possibility. The solution to this is replacing your carry ammunition yearly with fresh carry ammo.
      Thanks
      Deryck-PDN

      Reply

Tags: Rob Pincus, storage, vehicle firearms