Worlds Collide: Shooting Drills Without a Timer

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Rob Pincus and Rob Leatham are on the range debating what a valid measurement is when conducting shooting drills. What do measurements prove?

Timerless Shooting Drill

Rob Leatham has set up a drill with two rows of steel targets. The second row is invisible until the first row has been knocked down. In an unusual move for Rob, this is an untimed drill. The measurement will be how many hits are on the front target before it goes down and exposes the back target.

Both Robs shoot the drill and count how many hits it took to put down both targets. Rob Leatham actually missed one shot in this instance, but made no excuses for it. They discuss making excuses for mistakes, which was covered in detail in another Worlds Collide video.

However, both were accurate enough to knock down the targets, accuracy being the first measurement, and the second measurement, time, was not counted with a timer. But the need for speed was created by how long the target was available to the shooter.

Do-Over

Rob Leatham gets a do-over because of his missed shot the first time. And he misses one again this time, so the standard becomes Rob Pincus’ four hits to knock both targets down. They discuss the worth of setting standards for shooting drills.

Rob Pincus finds this drill engaging and more practical than chasing the timer as a means to improve. The standard has been set, but can he improve? That’s the impetus to keep practicing. But what they have established is that there are ways to measure shooting skills that do not require a timer and are practical.

Safety Warning

When shooting steel targets, take extra precautions as rounds may deflect or skip off in an unexpected direction: Maintain a minimum safe shooting distance, do not use steel targets that are pitted or cracked, and check the height of the berm behind the targets.

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