Safety with Weapon Mounted Lights

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For light use inside the home, Rob Pincus advocates using a light that is separate from your gun. If you’re using a handgun, it’s relatively simple. But when employing a long gun, things become more complicated as, for example, both your hands will be on the gun. Many People use weapon mounted lights as their primary light sources. But how do you use it safely? Rob demonstrates how to move through a dark house, illuminate it as you go, and not point a long gun at a family member.

Discussion
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6 Responses to “Safety with Weapon Mounted Lights”
  1. tjr

    You saved me big cash on a pistol mounted light and possibly an accident.

    Reply
    • Mike

      Lights fail. It’s never a bad idea to have two. I have one on my handgun and a handheld next to the firearm.

      Reply
  2. E M Johnson

    That’s the reason I use a handgun if I have to to move around my house. I think some training with the long gun and light might be in order.

    Reply
  3. David

    When it comes to any essential tool, my late father always taught me that two is one and one is none. I personally consider having a white light mounted to a defensive firearm to be an essential tool.

    I’ve had to clear many buildings in the last 22 years as a LEO and haven’t yet seen one where I didn’t need the use of my off hand to open doors, etc. and have found it extremely impractical to put my flashlight under an arm, under my chin, etc. while doing so. For that reason, I keep a light mounted on my duty pistol and check my batteries daily (I keep plenty of spares on hand). In that role I AM looking for hidden criminals unlike when I am at home, or off duty. I also carry a light on my person both on and off duty.

    Reply
  4. Jon Mackie

    Great points made by instructor. But I have not seen any videos pertaining to muzzle flash and how it affects the home owner defending his/her home. Can the flash from firing a firearm blind you and give the advantage to the home invader? How should we handle muzzle flash at night in a dark room?

    Thank you,
    Jon

    Reply

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