Short Grip, Longer Slide for Concealed Carry

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Over the years, Rob Pincus has done a lot of shooting with handguns that have a short grip and a longer slide. He explains why this is his preferred configuration for concealed carry.

ADVANTAGES OF A SHORT GRIP

For anyone who carries a handgun centerline (in front of the body, also known as appendix carry), a gun with a short grip is easier to conceal than one with a larger grip. Yes, the holster matters because it can tuck the grip back into the body, but in terms of comfort, the shorter the grip, the easier the handgun is to carry and conceal.

The majority of handguns with a short grip also have a short slide. A short slide is good for concealed carry and comfort when carrying appendix style, but when you start shooting, it’s harder to control the gun. Rob demonstrates with a Glock 43: easy to carry but not so easy to shoot. He’d prefer to have less recoil, more control over the gun, and be able to take faster follow-up shots. The shooter’s skill can only overcome so much — the physics of the gun are definitely a factor.

LONG-SLIDE SOLUTION

Rob also has a Glock 43 equipped with a Glock 48 slide. What that longer slide does is, it puts much more weight out in front of the shooter’s hand. A side-by-side comparison of the standard Glock 43 and the G43 with G48 slide shows the latter has almost an inch out in front. This means a lot more weight in front of the shooter’s hand on a percentage basis. The results are it’s a lot easier to manage recoil and get fast follow-up shots.

These are the major advantages of a long slide on a short grip. You get the concealability and carryability that you need, and you get faster follow-up shots, which are important not only in a defensive situation but also for handgun training and practice.

EXAMPLES

In addition to the modified Glock 43, Rob also has a prototype PD8 from Avidity Arms and a Springfield Armory XD-S 4”. The XD-S has been Rob’s carry gun for years and, of the three handguns, it gives him the most weight out in front of his hand, as it is a heavy slide. The grip is also the thickest of the three guns.

This is Rob’s preferred configuration for concealed carry: short grip and longer slide.