Training Discipline: Keeping Your Focus for the Best Self Defense

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As you approach a best self defense training plan, the concept of training discipline is incredibly important. Training discipline means making sure what you spend time, effort and energy on learning how to do is applicable to your intended situation or intended context of need or use. All the research and decision-making you do prior to going to a training class or going to practice a technique has to be based on some logic and critical thinking.

The Plausibility Principle

This concept suggests you spend all your time at the beginning worried about things that are most likely to occur to you, then as you have more resources to allocate, you expand to things that are reasonable to spend time, effort and energy on. If you started self defense firearms training to defend yourself from someone who was 300 yards away and you bought a scoped high-powered hunting rifle and learned to shoot high-level precision shots at extended distances, what are the odds this will ever be your most likely personal-defense scenario? It would be very low on the plausibility index. Always keep your best self defense in mind.

Plausible Skill Development

Many other less extreme examples abound related to basic firearms training. Training with an instructor who has an extensive overseas combat record will lead to the realization that skills useful for combat are not applicable to personal and home defense. Don’t get caught up in what is appropriate for someone else. Stay disciplined about your training needs and context of use.

Equipment

Training discipline also applies to equipment. It’s easy to get sucked into the hype of what hot piece of gear competition shooters are using or what police departments are purchasing. This extends from firearms to clothing. Buying gear not appropriate to your context of use is a waste of your resources and doesn’t support your best self defense.