Trigger Guards on Staged Guns for Home Defense

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What is the purpose of trigger guards?

All firearms owners have a responsibility to make sure their firearms are kept safe from unauthorized access. When it comes to defensive pistols inside the home, workplace or vehicle, the best way to do that is with a quick-access safe. If you’re not actually carrying the gun on your person but want to be able to access it quickly, the GunVault DrawerVault as shown in this video is a perfect choice.

Accessing the Gun

If you want to have an immediate response in the case of, for example, a home invasion, you need to keep a gun on your body. Staging a handgun as one of your home defense weapons in a quick-access safe can work if you have enough time to respond to an imminent confrontation, not an immediate one. How should you stage that handgun in the safe?

If you choose to keep a round chambered in the handgun while in the safe, take extra precautions to make sure that when grabbing the gun in a panic in the middle of a critical incident, you do not put a finger on the trigger. One way to prevent this is to put the gun in a holster, though that adds an extra step when retrieving it — grabbing the gun and taking it out of the holster. You can work on techniques such as this during handgun training sessions.

Trigger Guards

One of the best, easiest and quickest ways to solve the “accidental finger on the trigger” problem is by employing a trigger guard device. It attaches to the trigger and includes a lanyard that can be secured to a hook in the gun safe. When you reach for the gun, there is no way you can put a finger on the trigger.

Discussion
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6 Responses to “Trigger Guards on Staged Guns for Home Defense”
  1. Jim Fitzsimmons

    What are your thoughts on gun in a sticky pocket holster or a glock saftey block behind the trigger in the trigger guard ?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Jim. Using a sticky holster for protecting the trigger inside a quick access safe isn’t a horrible choice as long as the holster properly fits the handgun. Depending on the type of quick access safe removing the sticky holster could still require both hands. The glock safety block really isn’t advisable because there is a potential for it to become lodged in place or forgotten rendering the gun useless in that worse case scenario.
      Thanks
      Deryck-PDN

      Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello Ralph,

      There are a few companies that make those type of trigger guards but the one in the video came from The Mic Holsters. Others who make similar trigger guard type holders are Dale Fricke Holsters and Raven Concealment.

      Thanks,
      Deryck PDN Video Membership

      We’d love to have you be a part of our community. We are convinced you will enjoy the benefits of becoming a member and having access to the best instructional how to videos and professional tips. We would like to offer you a special promotion for your first year membership.
      http://go.personaldefensenetwork.com/C10708

      Reply
  2. dbell

    I question the safety of having a chambered round in a pistol safe. If there’s a fire, the heat could cause the round to fire and I think the metal of most pistol safes won’t stop the bullet, leaving the firemen and/or neighbors in danger. Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello,

      Could what you describe happen? Yes, given the perfect storm of unfortunate events a chambered round could cook off and be fired. If that is truly a concern there are ways to mitigate the perceived risk with the easiest being, store the handgun with a magazine inserted. The other options are have the quick access safe oriented so that the muzzle is pointed at a sufficient backstop if it goes off in the safe no one will be injured, re-enforce the muzzle end of the safe with a ballistic panel, or find a quick access safe with a thicker gauge of steel (3.9mm or more).

      Thanks,
      Deryck PDN Video Membership

      Reply

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